War Cannot Kill Creativity

Hire Ukrainian Creators

So, you liked our billboards. We get it – the artwork oozes passion and purpose. It tells a story with every line and drip of colour.

How does that happen? It’s because the artists that made these pieces – both displaced Ukrainian designers – have been robbed of everything else: their homes, their livelihoods, their lands. These murals are a life story. A testament to the price of freedom in the modern world. Their struggles are reflected in their art. And it shows.

We saw a chance to defy the forces that seek to destroy, rather than create. A way to bring a bit of hope to a hopeless situation. We found these artists on Behance and Instagram, and reached out to commission their work – because their stories deserve to be told.

You can do the same. Visit:

Don’t just stand by. Stand up.

Support displaced Ukrainian artists for your next creative project.


DONATIONS

Providing Hope to Ukraine

Thank you for choosing to support the people of Ukraine in this incredibly difficult time. As a longstanding company in western Canada, we at WJ are well aware of the deep historical and cultural bonds that exist between our communities and Ukraine. Now we must share the burden of ensuring a safer future for all.

Far from the Russian invasion, we have the immense privilege of being able to offer a safe platform for Ukrainian voices to speak freely and truthfully. We commissioned a pair of Ukrainian artists to design two murals which are currently being displayed in SaskTel Centre’s concourse.

We encourage you to visit the murals, learn more about these two artists below, and to consider further donations to the following worthy causes providing direct support to the Ukrainian people:

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Ievgen Velichev mural

Ievgen Velichev

Ievgen is an award-winning graphic designer and illustrator from Kyiv, currently living in Odessa. He holds several degrees and certifications for design and art from the K.D. Ushinky South Ukrainian National Pedagogical University in Odessa.

“54 days into the war, I am at home in Odessa. I was in Kyiv before, but came here to be with my family. I haven’t had any days off yet. It’s a question of morality for me; I simply can’t afford them because I am actively involved in office projects and helping international charity organizations. Not too long ago, I started drawing. I couldn’t do it for a while.Currently, I work in a flower shop called Botaniki, owned by my friend Christina. It’s quiet here. There is a bomb shelter in the basement. Knowing this helps to focus on work and not be distracted by anything. My heart and soul will fight to the end. Keep rallying for Ukraine.”

Hanna Mayson mural

Hanna Mayson

Hanna was born in Sevastopol, which fell under Russian occupation in 2014. She is an illustrator, creating custom artwork and designs inspired by people, the sea, flowers, and the colourful vintage prints of decades past. She was the co-owner of a volunteering project, KindCraft, in Kyiv, helping to paint fences at schools, and participated in an online exhibition dedicated to the fight against children’s cancer.

“Stop the war. On February 24, I woke to the sound of air raid sirens. It was Putin’s Russia that attacked us. The war started and my whole life split to before and after. I had to leave my home in Kyiv.During the next days, we followed roads towards western Ukraine. I was lucky to spend nights in offices, sleeping on chairs. When got to the safer part of Ukraine, for a while I lived in an office – spending time in a basement during air raid attacks and worrying about my relatives, friends, and all the other Ukrainians that I don’t personally know who are bombed by Russians right now. I created illustrations in support of my country which is now at war.”