Shelf appeal – Part 1 Wine

I know I’m a victim of it – buying one product over another purely on the packaging or brand name. Many brands have been keen to this for a long time. The visual impact and perception of a brand is key to its success. Grocery stores have been well known to charge a premium to brands that want to appear at eye level on their shelves for this very reason. Packaging designers try to make their products stand out in the shelves to compete for your attention and ultimately gain your buy in.

Liquor packaging is a great example of this. I’m not a wine connoisseur and I’ll admit, I take packaging into consideration when picking a new wine. A lot of times my deciding factor on which wine I pick and which wine I don’t pick may boil down to the label and if it has one of those award medallions. Sometimes I choose just based on how I feel about the label… (I know some of you fancy wine drinkers are gasping.)

I’ve noticed that some wine brands have gone away completely from trying to look the part of a serious winery and are out to make a statement. There are many people like me when it comes to buying wine and wine makers have taken notice. If you’re in the $15-20 a bottle there is a big gap in the bottle look and presentation of the brand.

The Show, Voga, The People’s Wine are great examples of brands that forget about being the traditional winery. They target the “non stuffy” wine drinkers and opt for packaging that is bold, fun and stands out on the shelves amongst the traditional wine labels.

 

It is nice to see wine brands that stand true to their brand in an industry with long traditional practices. I’ve even been fooled by wine labels that go the other way and do a good job looking the part of an established winery. Faux medallions that appear like the wine has won some awards have swayed my purchase. Upon closer review when I got home I saw that it was just some clever ploy to get wine consumers like me to buy their product, it worked. Clearly the wine industry is tapping into the many consumers that are not wine savvy and are paying attention to how they label and market their brand to embrace this type of consumer.